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The Crassula Collection: A Guide To Types, Sub-Varieties, & How To Care

The Crassula Collection: A Guide To Types, Sub-Varieties, & How To Care

This versatile and incredible succulent variety, with more than 300 species in its family, is our topic for the day. It has roots in South Africa and comes in different, unique leaf shapes and vibrant colors with stunning blossoms. 

Have you guessed it yet? Of course, it has to be the Crassula! In this article, you'll be given a detailed guide to "How To Care For Crassula" as we also discuss some of its popular types and growing conditions.

Let us quickly run down a background check on Crassula and its features.

Crassula 

There are about 300 different species in the Crassula family. Originally from South Africa's Eastern Cape, crassula come in many forms, such as annuals, perennials, woody plants, ground covers, shrubs, and even small trees. This makes it a suitable succulent for beginners, as this family has something to offer everyone. Almost all of these species remain compact and have a modest growth rate.

Each type of crassula offers something unique to all the succulent fans out there. Whether you want densely packed green leaves in bright green hues or thick fleshy leaves in a propeller shape in various tones of grey or blue, the Crassula family has got you.

Crassula ovata, also called "green jade", is the most well-known and popular type of Crassula plant known worldwide, and it is often added to mixed arrangements and assortments. Most crassula is toxic to pets and humans, so one should keep these succulents away from all sneaky hands. This succulent type is perfect for beginners as it is cold hardy, not easy to kill, and even thrives on negligence.

Crassula is popular houseplants for their adaptability, low care requirements, and symbolic meanings of good fortune and wealth. You can add a touch of tropical flair to any room by cultivating a jade plant on a windowsill as a shrub or tiny tree.

Now, it's time to look through some of the best crassula types and their maintenance requirements.

CRASSULA OVATA (Jade Plant)

crassula ovata plant

 

Let us begin with everyone's favorite and easily recognized succulent, the jade plant. According to Feng Shui, the "money plant" or "money tree," both of which refer to its link with riches and prosperity, has classic, tear-drop-shaped brilliant green leaves on a stout woody stalk, making this plant's stunning appearance. Plant your jade in a bright, indirect sunny position where the leaves will grow close together. Jade plants are easy, undemanding, and straightforward succulents that are prone to over-watering and soggy roots, so don't keep giving them showers often and try the "soak and dry" method.

What is the soak-and-dry method of watering?

The soak-and-dry method is the easiest way to water almost all your succulents. Watering the soil once and thoroughly before it goes bone dry is the ideal way of watering your succulents.

Sun exposure: Bright, indirect light
Water: Drought tolerant, allow the soil to dry before waterings
Soil: Well drained, neutral or acidic
Flower: White, pink blossoms
Common pests: Mealybugs, scales, mites
Toxicity: Toxic to humans and pets

A. CRASSULA OVATA "HUMMEL'S SUNSET"

CRASSULA OVATA "HUMMEL'S SUNSET"

 

This stunning, colorful, and showy plant is one of the types of jade plant, called the "Golden Jade Tree". Hummel's Sunset is a slow-growing succulent that produces pink star-shaped flowers in the winter months. This plant can work as a small tree or shrublet in your house, and the leaves take on incredible tinges of orange, golden, and crimson. 

Sun exposure: Bright indoor light, full sun
Water: Allow soil to dry before watering
Soil: Well-drained, ventilated and loose
Flower: White, pink blossoms
Common pests: Mealybugs, scales, mites, aphids
Toxicity: Toxic to humans and pets

CRASSULA PERFORATA (String of Buttons)

CRASSULA PERFORATA

 

From the rocky, dry slopes of South Africa, the string of buttons is a succulent known for its uniquely shaped leaves. The leaves grow in opposite directions to showcase their lovely stacked look. This is one of the fast-growing plants from the crassula family that survives both indoors and outdoors, as it can adapt to both partial and harsh sun. The string of green and greyish leaves may turn pinkish when the plant is stressed. 

A key to a healthy string of buttons is a good drainage pot and soil. Make sure you feed this plant a bunch of indirect sunlight to grow a happy string of buttons. The sub-varieties of Crassula perforata are Ivory Tower and Crassula perforata ssp. Kougaensis, and Crassula perforata Variegata.

 

Sun exposure: Full, partial sun
Water: Allow soil to dry before watering
Soil: Well-drained, sandy, acidic, alkaline, or neutral
Flower: White, yellow blossoms
Common pests: Mealybugs, scales, mites
Toxicity: Toxic to humans and pets

 

CRASSULA RUPESTRIS (Baby's necklace)

CRASSULA RUPESTRIS

 

The Baby's Necklace, or Rosary Plant, Baby's Necklace Vine, or Kebab Bush, is a South African plant with distinctive wedge-shaped green leaves that stack around the stem. It's related to (perforata) crassula rupestris, which grows in the eastern cape as well. Leaves develop beautiful yellow and red colors along their borders all summer long since this plant loves sunshine and does well in both direct and indirect light. This small shrub expands wide as well as tall, gracefully forming new stems like many other succulents. Like other succulents, this plant cannot haggle with overwatering as it drives to root rot.

Sun exposure: Full, partial sun
Water: Thoroughly water once before letting it dry (soak and dry)
Soil: Well-drained
Flower: White blossoms
Common pests: Mealybugs
Toxicity: Toxic to pets and people

Crassula collection here!

CRASSULA SPRINGTIME 

CRASSULA SPRINGTIME

C. springtime, like C. perforata and C. rupestris, is a gorgeous succulent with unusually shaped leaves. Despite its modest growth rate, this rosette-shaped succulent is perfect for use as a filler and spiller in containers and rock gardens. The leaves are thick, triangular, and greenish-grey; they are grouped and packed closely together. As its name implies, this succulent enjoys a sunny season. When winter approaches, the fat, thick leaves of this plant work as a protective cover from frost during winter. In its blooming months, this plant takes on a star shape and produces fragrant, beautiful blooms that draw in pollinators like bees and butterflies.

Sun exposure: Full, partial sun
Water: Thoroughly water once before letting it dry (soak and dry)
Soil: Well-drained
Flower: Pink, white blossoms
Common pests: Mealybugs, mites, scales
Toxicity: Toxic to animals 

CRASSULA TOM THUMB

CRASSULA TOM THUMB

 

The leaves of this rapidly expanding succulent are triangular in shape and a bright lime green color, yet under stress, the leaves may turn a deeper red. These unique, overlapping leaves are often used in living wreaths or used to decorate other succulent arrangements. This little shrub is native to the hot, dry mountains of South Africa and Namibia. These plants are accustomed to arid conditions and can survive for long periods without water. Tomb thumb is a tiny, beautifully trailing shrub that will stay compact in a container. During flowering time, this produces compact clusters of white flowers.

Sun exposure: Full, partial sun
Water: Thoroughly water once before letting it dry (soak and dry)
Soil: Fast-drained, sandy soil
Flower: White blossoms
Common pests: Mealybugs, fungi
Toxicity: Toxic to animals and humans 

CRASSULA ARBORESCENS UNDULATIFOLIA (Ripple Jade)

CRASSULA ARBORESCENS UNDULATIFOLIA (Ripple Jade)

 

The Ripple Jade, like other members of the Crassulaceae family, is a South African perennial evergreen succulent. The thin, wrinkled, or twisted blue-green leaves of this shrub are what gives it its unique name. Filling in the gaps between succulent mixed arrangements with ripple jade is a great idea because this plant loves to bask in the sun. In the spring and summer, this plant produces a spectacular show of pink star-shaped flowers. Overwatering is dangerous to this plant as it can't tolerate wet feet and will die of soggy roots.

Sun exposure: Full, partial sun
Water: Infrequent but thorough watering
Soil: Fast-drained, neutral to slightly acidic
Flower: White, pink blossoms
Common pests: Mealybugs, aphids
Toxicity: Toxic to animals and humans 

CRASSULA ARBORESCENS (Silver Dollar Jade)

CRASSULA ARBORESCENS (Silver Dollar Jade)

 

Plants with flat, oval, or disk-shaped leaves, such as the Chinese jade, beestebul, silver dollar jade, and silver dollar plant, grow slowly and require little care. Maroon spots could appear on the top surface of the blue-grey leaves if their edges turn red or pink. Having several thick, copper-brown stems, this plant from the crassula family makes a beautiful house shrub or even a small tree. The Silver Dollar Jade plant has clusters of pink and white flowers that resemble stars.

Sun exposure: Full, partial sun
Water: Soak and dry water method
Soil: Loamy, sandy, well-draining
Flower: White, pink blossoms
Common pests: Mealybugs, fungi
Toxicity: Toxic to animals and humans 

CRASSULA CAPITELLA (Campfire Crassula)

CRASSULA CAPITELLA (Campfire Crassula)

 

The campfire crassula is an eye-catching succulent with green, propeller-shaped leaves that turn brilliant red when exposed to direct sunlight or cold. This colorful kind of Crassula capitella is particularly striking because of its thick, meaty leaves, which are vibrant orange and red. During the blooming season, white flower clusters are produced on this sprawling evergreen plant. Although crassula wildfire can provide a beautiful fairy-tale display of butterflies in the summer and spring, the plant is susceptible to pests, and mealy bugs especially enjoy hiding among its densely packed leaves.


Sun exposure: Full, partial sun
Water: Soak and dry water method
Soil: Well-draining
Flower: White blossoms
Common pests: Mealybugs
Toxicity: Toxic to pets and people

These are just a few of the many crassula species that thrive in both indoor and outdoor settings and require little care on your part. A general "Guide to Care for crassula" would first include such factors as soil and weather conditions, watering techniques, and so on. 

jade plant care guide

 

Let's start with the ground conditions and the climate.

Soil: Cactus and succulent plants in general want their soil to drain well, and crassula is no exception. Most crassula like well-drained, loose, sandy soil (succulent or cactus mix) that can quickly absorb water to keep their roots from becoming waterlogged; these plants hate having their feet in the water and will die if they are. Insects and pests such as mealybugs, scales, spider mites, aphids, and fungal infections can wreak havoc on crassula, but if you keep an eye out for these problems, your plants will recover quickly and look great.

Light & Temperature: Crassula plants are soft, hardy succulents that thrive when exposed to full, indirect sunshine. Keep the leaves out of direct sunlight to prevent them from becoming scorched. Their green and blue leaves may change to bright pink, red, yellow, and orange if exposed to too much cold or heat, but this is not a cause for alarm.

Water: Because they are native to arid climates, such as those found in the deserts of Africa, succulents can survive without regular watering but will perish if given too much. If you want your crassula to thrive, use the "soak and dry" method of irrigation, in which you let the soil dry completely between waterings.

Flowering: Some crassula species bloom spectacularly in the summer and early spring, drawing pollinators like butterflies and bees to their nectar. Don't wake them up too much in the winter; they're hibernating and won't need much in the way of watering or care.

Pruning: Amazingly, these plants are capable of self-grooming and self-pruning, shedding their dead stems and leaves to make room for the growth of new ones and maximizing the plant's exposure to light and air.

Propagation: Succulents can be easily propagated by snipping off the top few inches and planting them upright in the ground, a technique that works for both shrubs and stacked crassula. You'll see new baby plants growing soon!

We've finally arrived at the end of the article. In conclusion, crassula succulents are beginner-friendly plants because they require very little care and eventually grow into a miniature bonsai-like tree or shrub, which makes a great aesthetic display for your space!

FAQ:

1. Are jade plants toxic to animals?

Yes, jade plants are slightly toxic to pets and humans 

2. Do I have to use cactus mix soil for succulents?

It is ideal to use succulent or cactus mix to pot your succulents. If you can't find a succulent or cactus mix, you can also make grittier soil by mixing soil and perlite in equal parts.

3. How long does it take for a crassula plant to die?

Most succulents, including crassula, can live from 20 years to 100 years, depending on how well you take care of them.

4. Can my crassula plant bloom?

While some crassula plants may bloom in the winter, the majority of them bloom in the warmer months of spring and summer. When they bloom, they display neat clusters of pink and white blossoms.

5. What is the soak-and-dry method of watering?

This method is about watering the soil once and thoroughly before it goes bone dry. Allow the soil to dry completely before watering.

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